Welcome Visitor

NOTE: This EBook is a simplified rendition of the website of The Morrison House. For the website see, www.themorrisonhouse.org. More about EBook: There are two formats that have been created; .mobi and .epub. Both of these options will open with hyperlinks intact. External websites and audio/video hyperlinks are highlighted for a quick connect. The .mobi file will open in the Kindle book reader application. Both Fire and earlier versions including non-tablet readers. So. More information and format downloads? See, www.williambrandes.com/a_ebook.


New! Morrison House Public Service Announcement. Audio. Listen. Brochure. Adobe PDF.
Please take a moment to explore the following fundraising program on Go Fund Me created for the Morrison House Project in Tiffin, Ohio. The Morrison House Go Fund Me Program.
We developed the Go Fund Me account to help support the ongoing financial needsof thisprogram. We currently receive grant dollars from the Ohio Development Services Agency (ODSA) andthe Ohio Department of Mental Health & Addiction Services (OhioMHAS). We have alsoreceived many donations from Seneca County areaagencies and businesses since our planning and construction phase began in 2009. (Special thanks to the Community Task Force, First Call for Help and the United Way office).

We have been open and serving the homeless population in Seneca County since December 5, 2012. Since that time, we have assisted 107 (unduplicated)individuals (85 adults and22 children).

The following data compiled for spring, 2015:

1. Of the 85 adults, 14 of these individuals are currently residing in the home and working towards a successful independent living plan for their futures.
2. Of the 71 remaining adults listed, 37 of them were successful in obtaining income and moving into the area community and are currently stable in their new housing environment.
3. This is a success rate of 52% since the Morrison House doors opened in 2012. We are so proud of these former and current tenants for making positive changes in their lives.

The bottom line is that this program is working!! We are hopeful to continue to provide supportive housing services to the homeless population of Seneca County for years to come. Please continue to support our efforts. The funding that wereceive from state grants is not enough to keep the house open and the programs running. Please share our fundraising link with your friends, families, and co-workers.

Do not hesitate to contact me with additional questions. I can beavailable to speak with your business or organizationto share more information about the Morrison House Project. Monetary donations can also be mailed to: New Housing Ohio, Inc. c/o The Morrison House Project. P.O. Box 25. Tiffin, Ohio 44883.

Thank you again for sharing this information and for the continued support of our program. Best Regards.

RoneleMyers
Community Relations Specialist
The Morrison House Project
New Housing Ohio, Inc.
366 Wentz Street
Tiffin, Ohio 44883
Phone: 567-245-3744
Fax: 567-220-7080

The Morrison House, formally the Mad River Railroad Bed and Breakfast, was built in 1880 and one of the premier stately homes in the Tiffin area. The structure offers over 8,000 square feet of living space. Because of it's size, it offers an extraordinary opportunity for offering unique transitional housing for families and individuals needing a hand's up.

Read The_Advertiser-Tribune Article of January 27, 2011. Read The Advertiser-Tribune Article of November 21, 2011 on The Morrison House Transitional Housing Project.

THERE ARE HOMELESS PEOPLE IN TIFFIN. The Community Task Force for Community Assistance is asking for your help. The Task Force in conjunction with New Housing Ohio has purchased the former Bed and Breakfast at 107 West Perry Street and has renovated the building for a transitional homeless shelter. This facility is named The Morrison House in honor of the family that has done much to make this project possible.

The Morrison House will be supervised 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. It will provide a safe haven for singles and families for a period of up to 120 days. All residents will be subject to background screening and required to participate in ongoing programs to help reestablish themselves in the community as productive citizens.

A supervisory board comprised of members of the Tiffin community will oversee the administration of The Morrison House and activities. Although a large portion of funding will be provided through grants from the state and federal government, there still remains ongoing operational and maintenance expenses that will need to come from a wide base of community support.

Any support for The Morrison House, financial, in-kind or volunteer assistance is greatly appreciated.

OPERATIONAL EXPENSES FROM NON-GRANT FUNDING: Estimated between $3,500 - $4,500 monthly. One of the requirements of the Community Task Force is for the transitional homeless shelter be supervised 24 hours a day. Although this makes the facility more expensive to operate it also makes it a safe environment and allows the trained staff more time to concentrate their efforts to get residents back on their feet and into society. Therefore, in order to sustain this effort, we are looking for private assistance in a variety of areas.

FINANCIAL OBLIGATIONS: Certain obligations (staff salaries, utilities, repairs) will require cash outlays. Donations to The Morrison House will be greatly appreciated. However, our primary concern is sustainability. Small monthly, quarterly or yearly pledges by individuals or organizations will be a significant benefit to our continued viability.

IN-KIND DONATIONS: Housing homeless individuals will require many of the everyday basics that we take for granted. Linens, bedding, hygienic supplies, diapers, food-stuffs and toiletries are just a few of the necessities that The Morrison House will need to operate.

VOLUNTEER ASSISTANCE: There are some facets of operating The Morrison House that will not be cash expenses such as lawn-mowing, minor repairs and maintenance, light house-cleaning, meals for the residents and transformation needs. All of these concerns will have to be addressed. It is our hope that volunteers from the community will step up to assist with these and similar tasks. Anyone interested in participating in this worthwhile opportunity can contact us for more information.

Pat DeMonte, Executive Director - Tiffin-Seneca United Way.
Telephone: 419.448.0355

Your help will enrich the lives of countless others in our local community.

The Morrison Family.Extraordinary Legacyy

A HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE: by Susan Nugent. I would like to introduce my grandparents who were very proud hard working people. My grandparents were known for helping and caring for other people throughout their lives. The Morrison House is an extension of their love and care for the people of this area.

My Grandpa, Kenny, had a grandfather who was a Lutheran minister. He was raised in a large family. The family was very involved in Tiffin and the surrounding area. Kenny always had such a good outlook on life. Meeting my grandmother changed his life, and the life of so many others.

My Grandma Annie was born and raised in Ober-Urbach, Germany in 1904. Ober-Urbach is near Stuttgart in southern Germany. Grandma was four years old when her mother died. She was raised by her father and grandmother. Grandma used to sit and cry watching other girls and their moms walking together down the street. She knew the loneliness of being without a mom at a young age.

Life was hard in Germany during this time and the people did not have a lot of food. Grandma, and her family picked grass and tree bark to make soup. They picked berries and nuts when they were in season. During World War I the castle near her town was turned into a hospital and prisoner of war camp. Grandma volunteered time caring for the patients and prisoners. She walked to the castle, in Stuttgart, and back home every time she worked there.

After finishing school, grandma was sent to a Russian family as an indentured servant. She worked in the fields, cared for their house, took care of animals, or anything they needed. In return, food and money was sent to her family to help keep them alive. Grandma was proud that she worked so hard to care for her family back in Ober-Urbach.

Grandma's father was killed during a thunderstorm in 1922. Grandma was still living in Russia as an indentured servant during this time. She returned home in time for his funeral. Without parents, in post war Germany, it was hard to make a living. Grandma's uncles from Ohio happened to come to Germany for the Oberammergau Passion Play shortly after her father's death. It was agreed that grandma, her younger sister, brother and grandmother would go to America for a new beginning.

Grandma came to America on a ship named The Empress of Scotland. It took her two weeks to get to the new world by ship. Grandma's uncle stayed on the first class level while she had to go below to the lower class deck. She came to a new country scared and could not understand the language. Grandma went to her uncle's house, in Jenera (near Findlay) when they reached Ohio.

Grandma's uncle's wife was angry that a German girl was brought to her house. The aunt hated Germans since her brother was killed by Germans in World War I. Grandma was only able to stay one night with the aunt and uncle. The next day grandma was sent to her grandmother's brother's house in Findlay. She was told that she could not live there for free and would have to go to work to make a living.

Grandma took a job as a dish washer at a restaurant. Later, through the assistance of her preacher, grandma was able to get a job as a governess in Findlay for the Fort Flowers' family. Grandma cared for five children, assisted during parties and had other duties at the Flowers' home. Grandma was also able to attend English classes at The Findlay College. Grandma maintained this job for several years until her marriage to Kenneth Morrison in 1926.

Grandpa and grandma had three children during their marriage Paul, Anna, and Carl. Grandma wanted to become an American citizen like her husband and children. She proudly became a citizen on December 15, 1938. She and grandpa continued living the American dream raising their children, as well as caring for their neighbors.

While living in Tiffin, on Erie Street, some Junior Home boys were looking for a place to live. Years ago there was no welfare system to care for kids and families without money. The kids could be placed in orphanages such as the Junior Order of Mechanics Orphanage. Upon graduation, and reaching 18 years old, the kids had to leave the home. They would look for somewhere to stay to be near family. In some cases the Jr. Home kids stayed with grandpa and grandma until they had a job. Over the years grandpa and grandma opened their doors to fifty Jr. Home boys and one Jr. Home girl.

Grandma knew what it was like to have no family, no money, no place to go, and no one to love you. Years before grandma made a pledge to help people who were in need. Her opportunity came about with the Jr. Home kids. For years grandpa and grandma would take in the kids a couple at a time. It may have been a couple of days, weeks or months. Grandma would do their laundry, offer meals, a warm home and love to the kids in need. Grandpa and grandma even helped with saving accounts so the kids had money when they needed it.

In 1947 the Jr. Home closed its doors in Tiffin and the kids moved to other states. About this time displaced persons and people from Europe were coming to America. Post World War II Europe had massive destruction and people wanted new beginnings. Again the doors opened to Kenny and Annie's home. Annie lived through World War I in Germany and knew the hardships these displaced people were going through.

Grandpa and grandma were contacted by different churches, factories, collages, the YMCA and more. The people coming to Tiffin needed help finding jobs, learning how to set up their houses, getting the kids into school, learning the English language, filling out paper work, meals, a place to stay and much more. Some of these people were single men, while others were families with kids.

Grandpa and grandma gave something special to each person they touched. They respected and loved everyone. Grandpa and grandma gave of themselves letting each person know they were important and loved. Grandpa and grandpa gave people new starts and helped them get on their feet. Each person that was helped by my grandparents knew that they had someone they could depend upon. For many years after her husband's death in 1966 grandma took in or cared for people in need. Men, women and families came to grandma's house to get a new start or some place to stay until they got on their feet.

Their kids married and had children. Paul married Carolyn and had three children: Jeff, Eric and Michelle. Anna married Joseph Cholodewitsch and had four children: Steven, Susan, Michael and Carol. Carl married Marlene and had two children: Lowell and Lisa. Kenny died before all of the grandchildren were born. Annie loved her grandparents very much. Each grandchild was touched in a special way by the love of grandma.

The next time you hear of The Morrison House and the people that are being helped, remember our grandparents and how they changed the world, one person at a time. Thank you for taking your time to read a long and personal story of people we love so much.

The grandkids of Kenneth and Annie Morrison:

Jeff and Katherine Morrison
Eric and Grace Morrison
Michelle and Damien Jones
Steve Cholodewitsch
Susan and Ed Nugent
Mike and Kelly Cholodewitsch
Lowell and Katrina Morrison

Volunteer. Financial Gifting

Please take a moment to explore the following fundraising program on Go Fund Me created for the Morrison House Project in Tiffin, Ohio. The Morrison House Go Fund Me Program.


We developed the Go Fund Me account to help support the ongoing financial needsof thisprogram. We currently receive grant dollars from the Ohio Development Services Agency (ODSA) andthe Ohio Department of Mental Health & Addiction Services (OhioMHAS). We have alsoreceived many donations from Seneca County areaagencies and businesses since our planning and construction phase began in 2009. (Special thanks to the Community Task Force, First Call for Help and the United Way office).

We have been open and serving the homeless population in Seneca County since December 5, 2012. Since that time, we have assisted 107 (unduplicated)individuals (85 adults and22 children).

1. Of the 85 adults, 14 of these individuals are currently residing in the home and working towards a successful independent living plan for their futures.
2. Of the 71 remaining adults listed, 37 of them were successful in obtaining income and moving into the area community and are currently stable in their new housing environment.
3. This is a success rate of 52% since the Morrison House doors opened in 2012. We are so proud of these former and current tenants for making positive changes in their lives.

The bottom line is that this program is working!! We are hopeful to continue to provide supportive housing services to the homeless population of Seneca County for years to come. Please continue to support our efforts. The funding that wereceive from state grants is not enough to keep the house open and the programs running. Please share our fundraising link with your friends, families, and co-workers.


Do not hesitate to contact me with additional questions. I can beavailable to speak with your business or organizationto share more information about the Morrison House Project. Monetary donations can also be mailed to: New Housing Ohio, Inc. c/o The Morrison House Project. P.O. Box 25. Tiffin, Ohio 44883.

Thank you again for sharing this information and for the continued support of our program. Best Regards.

RoneleMyers
Community Relations Specialist
The Morrison House Project
New Housing Ohio, Inc.
366 Wentz Street
Tiffin, Ohio 44883
Phone: 567-245-3744
Fax: 567-220-7080


THANIK YOU BAUMANN AUTO GROUP. Baumann gives charities $100,000. The Advertiser-Tribune. February 25, 2013. By MaryAnn Kromer - Staff Writer. The Baumann Auto Group has a long history of giving to local charities. Recently, owner Buck Baumann divided a donation of $100,000 among 10 organizations on behalf of all the Baumann Auto Group employees. In Seneca County, The Morrison House in Tiffin and First Step in Fostoria each received $10,000. Buck Baumann and Dave Conn of GM of Baumann Tiffin, presented checks to both agencies February 13. Accepting the check for The Morrison House were Patricia DeMonte - director of Tiffin Seneca United Way, Terry Jones - task force member and Ronele Myers of New Housing Ohio.

New Housing Ohio Opening Doors. Changing Lives:

Dear Friends of the Community. In December 2012, the Community Task Force and New Housing Ohio opened the doors to the Morrison House, a transitional home for the homeless in Seneca County. A typical stay for each resident is 90 to 180 days, depending on each resident?s situation.

The Morrison House is a transitional housing facility located in Tiffin, Ohio to help individuals and families who need a shelter from the storms of life. Our programs include shelter, meals, and support services for homeless individuals and families. We allow the residents time to work through their individual issues that have caused them to be homeless. Our staff works with each resident to provide immediate stability. A case manager works with them to develop a plan of hope and recovery from homelessness.

We are seeking assistance from our community to ensure the success of the Morrison House. The following is a list of various opportunities:

FINANCIAL: Certain obligations (i.e., staff salaries, utilities, repairs) will require cash outlays. Prepared meal donations on a monthly basis to provide a hot balanced meal for residents. VOLUNTEER: Time to visit and share skills with residents. Landscaping opportunities and necessary tools/materials.

Your participation and support is greatly appreciated and is vital to the success of our community program. Together we can affect change to help those who are struggling with the challenges of life, giving them hope for a brighter future. If you would like to learn more about our volunteer opportunities, please call the Morrison House at 567-220-6003.

Thank you in advance for your consideration. Sincerely, Ronele Myers Site Manager, Morrison House Facility 107 West Perry Street Tiffin, Ohio 44883 567-245-3744.

Advertiser-Tribune Article 3

Morrison House opens doors

As written (linked above) in The Advertiser-Tribune. December 6, 2012 by Zach Gase, zgaseo@advertiser-tribune.com - Permission granted by The Advertiser-Tribune to display on this website.

Today a project to fight homelessness that took about three years culminates with the first resident moving into Morrison House. Morrison House is a former bed and breakfast that has been developed into transitional living facility, with the help of former Tiffin Mayor Jim Boroff's Task Force, New Housing Ohio and the Tiffin community. "The primary focus is to help them make a change, and get them linked with what they need to be successful in the community again," said Ronele Myers, of New Housing Ohio. "People sometimes don't know where to find the resources."

The Morrison House welcomes its first resident today. The transitional housing facility hosted an open house Wednesday. Residents may live in Morrison House for three to six months, she said. The amount of time a person stays in the house depends on how quickly they can find employment and living arrangements. "We'll be working on their exit plan on the day they arrive," she said.

The house has seven bedrooms, a few of which have bunk beds for families. Maximum occupancy is 28, Myers said. Terry Jones, of Christ's Church at Tiffin, is a member of the task force and said homelessness not only refers to people who are out on the street, but also people who are "doubling up" - living with family or friends.

Wednesday Morrison House opened its doors and put the remodeled residence on display. "There have been so many players in the community who have played a huge role from the first day of construction, that we wanted to make sure that we invited them to see the finished product of what they helped us create," Myers said. "So, just wanted to open the door." Scott Boone, president and CEO of New Housing Ohio, said purchasing and renovating the house cost roughly $300,000. "This particular home gave us the opportunity to provide a welcoming place for folks to call home," he said. "In many cases, particularly in bigger cities, you'll see places that serve this kind of population in more of a dormitory style very unwelcoming facility. We wanted something that felt like a home."

Boone credited Schreiner Custom Stairs and Millwork Inc., who worked as the main contractor for the house's renovations, to making the house have a homey feel. Renovations were all done by local contractors, he said. "This is a partnership of many organizations throughout this community," he said. "There are folks who contributed to this that this wouldn't have happened without." The house has received donations from the National Machinery Foundation, Federal Home Loan Bank and the state, Jones said. Operational expenses from non-grant funding for Morrison House are estimated at $3,500-$4,500 a month. Jones said the house is going to need continuous support from the community.

"We have the wherewithal to do what we do because we're bootstrapped," Boroff said. "We don't get help from outside. We've always had to do things on our own, so any resources, we find it."

The house got its name from Kenneth and Anna Morrison, former residents of Tiffin who used to take in young men too old to stay at the Junior Home Orphanage. "They made a wonderful donation to the community with this home," she said. People interested in living at the house or referring people should contact United Way's First Call for Help program.

"We're not done," Boroff said. "This is a project that's on its way, but we're looking for other things too. And we're looking for other people to become involved."

Advertiser-Tribune Article 2

Home sweet home. Morrison House staff to assist area?s homeless

As written (linked above) in The Advertiser-Tribune. November 21, 2011 by Nick Dutro, ndutro@advertiser-tribune.com - Permission granted by The Advertiser-Tribune to display on this website.

Although residents of Tiffin and Seneca County may not see homeless living on the streets every day, it is a reality for many. However, an initiative to address the need, and a tool to fight homelessness, is moving close to an opening date.

Located at a former bed and breakfast at 107 W. Perry St., Morrison House originally came out of the Mayor's Task Force for Community Assistance as an initiative to provide emergency and transitional housing for homeless individuals as they prepare to acquire and maintain permanent housing. The property could be opening as early as March.

"For me, the projects are extremely worthwhile, but I feel very validated by the community that steps up to do these projects," said Tiffin Mayor Jim Boroff. "This is something where people are really stepping up. This is what sets us apart, in my mind, from other communities - we take pride in what we're doing."

Like other projects which originated through the task force, Morrison House has become a community project. In this case, New Housing Ohio, which already has redeveloped three properties in Tiffin as apartment complexes and group homes, is to take over administration.

"We have been doing this since 1996. It definitely fits within our mission and we're really only replicating what we've been successful at in the past," said Scott Boone, president and chief executive officer of New Housing Ohio.

The house is to primarily serve individuals and families, some with small children. Renovations have been minimal, but include converting the third floor into livable space. The house is to have seven bedrooms, several bathrooms, a large kitchen and dining room, several shared sitting areas and laundry.

Unlike Boroff's early ideas of a homeless shelter from before he started the process - which he likened to as a "flop house," where patrons are given a bed and a meal and sent on their way - Morrison House is to provide support to get people back on their feet as well as shelter.

"We like to think that we create taxpayers," Boone said. "We're helping them gain employment (and life skills) to become a gainful member of society."

Karin Mobley, who is to serve as site manager for Morrison House and other New Housing Ohio properties, said she is happy to see it is to be place for education as well as provides emergency and transitional housing for those in need.

"It's skills that will later be carried out to life outside the shelter," she said.

Providing those life skills has been a mission of the task force, which has worked to establish the Getting Ahead project to provide instruction on building social, financial and life skills, as well as some financial assistance for students who complete the course.

Boroff and Pat DeMonte, executive director of the Tiffin-Seneca United Way and task force member, said the program has been successful in Tiffin so far.

Morrison House already has received operation and capital funding through local and state organizations. Over the next bienium, $125,000 from Ohio Department of Development in operational funds and $80,000 from National Machinery Foundation in capital have been pledged for the project.

The site also received $25,000 through Tiffin Charitable Foundation toward the purchase price, and about $30,000 in community aid.

Although funds may be available as soon as January, Boone and Mobley said they are looking closer to March as an opening date.

"I'm just excited to start this adventure while helping the many under served people in our community," Mobley said.

Through the support of the task force and Terry Jones, senior minister at Christ Church in Tiffin, the property was purchased by New Housing Ohio, with the help of previous owners Jeffery and Katherine Morrison. The house is named after Jeffery's grandparents, Tiffin residents Kenneth and Anna Morrison, who took in young men as they aged out of Junior Home Orphanage in Tiffin.

"We have many people in this area who are homeless, but not necessarily living on the streets," Jones said. "I'm interested in helping those people."

Jones has continued his involvement with the project, through a seat on the task force and as chairman of the Morrison House Advisory Board, which is to work with the New Housing Ohio board of directors.

Locally, members of the task force said they are happy to be working with Boone and New Housing Ohio.

"Every project he has been involved with has been done, and done right," Boroff said. "Even if it's in a gray area, he's not taking any changes or cutting any corners. If we're going to be housing people and providing a secure environment for people, we want to make sure we're doing it right."

"He looks at individuals who are homeless, not homeless individuals," said DeMonte, who added she appreciates the amount of respect he shows for everyone he works with.

According to statistics from Coalition on Homelessness and Housing in Ohio, 60 individuals in Seneca County were homeless during a count Jan. 25. In the count, 43 were without shelter.

Although the number is lower than 89 counted in 2010, it's a statistic that could increase at any time, DeMonte said, who has been a witness to more need through United Way programs in the past few years.

"It really goes along with what I do in my job, it's really part of what United Way is about," DeMonte said about Morrison House and the efforts of the task force. "I feel that we are improving the lives of people in Seneca County - not just giving them a handout, but a hand-up."

Morrison House is the latest of the projects being considered through the task force, which also is considering a project to aid children before and after school in the future.

And while Boroff may only have two months left in his tenure as mayor, he said the group - and its efforts - will live on.

"I'm not the lynch pin by any means," Boroff said. "This is something that should have a life of it's own. I'd love to see other groups form (community assistance organizations) in other areas."

Copyright 2011 The Advertiser-Tribune. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

The Advertiser-Tribune Article

Former bed and breakfast to become transitional housing

As written (linked above) in The Advertiser-Tribune. January 27, 2011 by Nick Dutro, ndutro@advertiser-tribune.com - Permission granted by The Advertiser-Tribune to display on this website.

Tiffin Mayor Jim Boroff said he knew there was homelessness in Seneca County, but he said he is the first to admit his ignorance to the types of homeless and how to meet their needs.

These were some of the reasons behind the formation of the mayor's task force. Today, the group is addressing the issue with Morrison House.

Located in a former bed and breakfast, 107 West Perry Street, the facility is to provide emergency and transitional housing for homeless individuals and families as they prepare to acquire and maintain permanent housing.

"We knew there was an issue, that we were putting a Band-Aid on the problem and not getting progress," said Pat DeMonte, executive director for United Way and a task force member. "We don't look at this as a homeless shelter, but transitional housing for people. To have a safe, secure place for them to live while they are transitioning into more financial stability where they can afford to have their own home."

Morrison House was purchased by New Housing Ohio Inc. which worked with the mayor's task force to find a space for area homeless, and with the help of previous owners Jeffery and Katherine Morrison. The house is named after Jeffery's grandparents, Tiffin residents Kenneth and Anna Morrison, who took in young men as they aged out of the Junior Home Orphanage in Tiffin.

Scott Boone, president and chief executive officer of New Housing Ohio, said this is the fourth property acquired and rehabilitated in Tiffin. He met Boroff while working with the other properties.

The mayor praised Boone on his effort and invited him to be part of the task force.

"He has no agenda that I've been able to surmise other than he wants to help whoever needs help," Boroff said.

Boone said the Lebanon-based group is dedicated to Tiffin, and has received $1 million in private grants to do area projects.

"We're not just giving hand outs," he said. "We like to think that we're creating taxpayers ... getting people off of assistance and helping them become productive members of the community."

Tiffin resident Rachelle Griffin, who is homeless liaison for the Fostoria City Schools and a member of the task force, said the house is to have seven bedrooms, several bathrooms, a large kitchen and dining room, several shared sitting areas and laundry.

Because it started as a bed and breakfast, it retains most of the furniture and amenities.

"They wanted to ensure individuals were progressing in their lives," Boone said. "We felt like the ambiance of the building would go far to helping with those goals."

The mayor's task force started two years when Boroff received correspondence from the U.S. Census Bureau asking where homeless could be counted for the 2010 Census. Boroff turned to DeMonte and soon began a discussion on how to aid the homeless a population which could be on the rise due to recession and job loss.

"We were not going to try to reinvent any wheels, nor were we going to try to micromanage or supervise any existing organizations," Boroff said. "We were really trying to identify any holes there might be as far as needs, as well as try to make the services more apparent to people who need them."

The task force began to look for projects and identified 17 types of homelessness. Programs started include a food drive, which has been held the past two years around Valentine's Day, and "Getting Ahead in a Just Getting By World," a 20-week course to help people help themselves.

"This program works with individuals to show them how to pull themselves out, to extricate themselves from the bad influences of friends and family, how to manage money, the expectations when you get a job," Boroff said.

The task force is not a city function, but works as a neutral party through the mayor's office to organize individuals in the community.

"When people ask what the task force is, I always say we're the catalyst, we're not the experts," Boroff said.

Morrison House is months from being ready for residents, but the group has ideas for how to help the facility function.

Boroff said it will not be part of the mayor's task force, but is to be staffed around the clock through a board or foundation working with New Housing Ohio.

In addition, there will be a need for community support, not just financial but also in services and talent.

Demographics of those living in the facility are to be decided by New Housing Ohio, but the group said there will be a protocol for those housed.

"It's not going to be somebody showing up on the doorstep and immediately having shelter here without knowing who that person is, because that wouldn't be fair to the families who are here," Griffin said.

Boroff said the hope is that one day there will be no need for a facility for the homeless. For now, however, Morrison House can help people in difficulty, including youth.

"When you have to go home to a home that is not yours, that there is not a place to sit down to do your homework that's yours, that you're sharing two beds in a bedroom with a parent or a sibling, when you show up at school the next day, many times you are not ready to learn," Griffin said. "When you've got a lot on your plate, you're not ready."

Copyright 2011 The Advertiser-Tribune. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

The Morrison House Video

The Morrison House video. Created by students from Heidelberg University in cooperation with theMayor's Task Force. All voluntary, no public funds were used to produce this video.

The Morrison House Mission: Provide transitional housing, support, stability, and nurturing for individuals and families as they prepare to acquire and maintain permanent housing.


New Housing Ohio Mission: Improve the quality of life for underserved individuals by providing access to safe, decent and affordable housing, transportation, employment, and related supports.

New Housing Ohio. New Housing Ohio Facebook. Seneca Help. Tiffin-Seneca United Way.


FCC LifeLine Program. SafeLink Wireless Program. Ohio Job and Family Services.